Blue inner thighs

Do you have a question about anatomy, life cycle, taxonomy, or anything else that isn't covered by the other frogs.org.au projects? Ask them here (or provide an answer to other people's questions).

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Evan
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Postby Evan » Wed Jul 26, 2006 10:11 pm

Yeah, I'd agree with that.

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Brad M
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Postby Brad M » Thu Jul 27, 2006 7:46 am

There is nothing that evolves a certain way without a reason to do so. The armpit colouration must be for something and you can't really call it flash colouration because it is visible all the time. The belly patterns on the other hand would be more like flash colouration because it isn't visible all the time.

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Gerry Marantelli
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Postby Gerry Marantelli » Mon Jul 31, 2006 2:35 am

Many species use both camouflague and warning colour. Pseudophryne and a number of others do have a stance that deliberately exposes their coloured parts. Not being seen can be useful even if you are poisonous and if you are seen you can then demonstrate it.

You may notice that resting Pseudophryne do not show any of their "colour" but it is exposed as soon as they move. You may also notice that they do not move very quickly and in fact slowly and deliberately show their "colour" as they walk off from a confrontation. Such fearless behaviour could not evolve in a non toxic species. In fact Pseudophryne contain many toxins in their skin including the pumiliotoxins used by the poison dart frogs (collected from their diet) and pseudophrynamines which they manufacture. These are among the most toxic compounds on earth.

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Brad M
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Postby Brad M » Mon Jul 31, 2006 4:50 pm

Gerry Marantelli wrote:

...You may notice that resting Pseudophryne do not show any of their "colour" but it is exposed as soon as they move. You may also notice that they do not move very quickly and in fact slowly and deliberately show their "colour" as they walk off from a confrontation...


That can't apply for P.australis, corroberee, coriacea etc.

Gerry Marantelli
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Postby Gerry Marantelli » Wed Aug 02, 2006 12:31 am

you are right - I was referring to the species being discussed in the posts above who display shoulder groin and thigh warning coloration.

Obviously many others exhibit permanently exposed warnings.


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