New frog species list

Need some help to identify a frog (or tadpole or egg mass)? Sounds like a job for the collective minds of the Community. Photographs and/or recordings are greatly appreciated. Results guaranteed (All money cheerfully refunded).

Moderators: Chris Key, Gerry Marantelli, Mod Squad

Gerry Marantelli
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New frog species list

Postby Gerry Marantelli » Tue Sep 13, 2011 7:51 pm

Hi all

a job for those interested in ID

we need a list of all frog species named or split from others (includes old names that have been resurrected due to splitting) since 2000. we also need the reference for the paper in which they were described/split.

2 reasons - there will soon be an IUCN review of status of Australian frogs and we need them all to be included and while we are at it I would like to update the Frogs of Australia section to incliued all the new ones etc.

if you can list them here in this topic with Name, Paper and Year that would be a big help

I will forward all "our" results to the guys doing the review and they will share any we miss with us.

many Thanks
Gerry

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Postby Chris Key » Wed Sep 14, 2011 9:58 am

I'll get the ball rolling then. Hope this is sort of what you were after.

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A new species of Litoria (Anura: Hylidae) with a highly distinctive tadpole from the north-western Kimberley region of Western Australia

http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2010/f/zt02550p057.pdf

Litoria aurifera sp. nov. - Kimberley Rockhole Frog

Zootaxa
Issue 2550, 27 July 2010, Pages 39-57

ABSTRACT
We describe a small hylid frog species with a highly distinctive tadpole from the Kimberley region of northern Western Australia. The new taxon is morphologically very similar to Litoria meiriana but can be differentiated using a combination of adult and larval morphology and male calls. Tadpoles of the new taxon can be readily differentiated from those of L. meiriana by their unique black, gold and red pigment patterns and the continuous papillary border around the oral disc. Advertisement calls of L. aurifera sp. nov. are longer, have more pulses, have more marked frequency modulation and are produced at a lower rate than those of L. meiriana. Litoria aurifera sp. nov. is only known from locations up to about 100 km south of the Prince Regent River and is associated with small creeks on massive sandstone escarpments, while L. meiriana is widespread in escarpments across northern Western Australia and the northern part of the Northern Territory.



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A new species of Uperoleia (Anura: Myobatrachidae) from the northwest Kimberley, Western Australia

http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2008/f/zt01939p018.pdf

Uperoleia micra sp. nov. - Tiny Toadlet

Zootaxa
Issue 1939, 21 November 2008, Pages 10-18

ABSTRACT
Uperoleia is a large genus of small-bodied terrestrial frogs that occur in Australia and southern New Guinea. With nine species, the Kimberley region in northern Western Australia is the most diverse. Recent surveys of the northwest coast of the Kimberley have revealed a tenth species of Uperoleia. The new species is characterized by a combination of small body size, dark and slightly tubercular dorsal skin, basal webbing between the toes, outer metatarsal tubercle spatulate and oriented perpendicular to the foot, possession of maxillary teeth, a broadly exposed frontoparietal fontanelle and the advertisement call is a high-pitched rasp. All specimens collected have been associated with sandstone boulders or escarpments with flowing water or rock pools. The northwest Kimberley is an isolated region of high rainfall and rugged terrain that possesses high biodiversity for many plant and animal groups and is therefore worthy of special conservation attention.


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Species boundaries among barred river frogs, Mixophyes (Anura: Myobatrachidae) in north-eastern Australia, with descriptions of two new species

http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2006f/z01228p060f.pdf (abstract only)

Zootaxa
Issue 1228, 9 June 2006, Pages 35-60

ABSTRACT
Mixophyes are large ground-dwelling myobatrachid frogs from eastern Australia and New Guinea. We use analyses of allozyme frequencies, nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial DNA and morphology to define species boundaries in Mixophyes from the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area of northern Queensland. The molecular analyses identify a minimum of three species in the region. Morphometric and meristic analyses corroborate these distinctions. The existence of two of these species was not previously suspected, and they are formally described herein.


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Last edited by Chris Key on Thu Sep 15, 2011 7:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Gerry Marantelli
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Postby Gerry Marantelli » Thu Sep 15, 2011 7:01 pm

hey Chris - good job thats exactly what we are after

just two things:
- the third one we don't need (its a worm!) maybe a typo or cut and paste error?

- the last one re: Mixophyes you didn't list the new species described (title says 2 new species)

but the first two were perfect - you have the name of the frog and the paper it was described in - well done

Gerry Marantelli
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Postby Gerry Marantelli » Thu Sep 15, 2011 7:18 pm

OK lets make this interesting

I will offer a prize - to the person who gets the most new species additions to this post.

Chris is of to a good start with 2 and it looks like he will add 2 more soon (Mixophyes in his fourth reference not yet named.)

so everyone keep adding as you find them.

and the prize?
well i will give the winner your choice of $100 to spend on crickets in the ARCade or for those who don't need crickets, i have a poison frog dart gun (the real thing) made in the Colombian amazon by the local indians or a very nice Tagua carving from the wounaan indians of Panama - considered to be the best tagua carvers in the world. Will post pics to whet your appetite once i see some action on this thread.

good luck
Gerry

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Postby Chris Key » Thu Sep 15, 2011 7:44 pm

thanks Gerry. Waiting for full text for the last one. I've edited to remove the worm (!!!) how embarrassing!

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Postby Chris Key » Thu Sep 15, 2011 7:59 pm

Description, biology and conservation of a new species of Australian tree frog (Amphibia: Anura: Hylidae: Litoria) and an assessment of the remaining populations of Litoria genimaculata Horst, 1883: systematic and conservation implications of an unusual speciation event

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... 805.x/full

Litoria myola sp. nov

Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
Volume 91, Issue 4, pages 549–563, August 2007

ABSTRACT
The Australian populations of the green-eyed tree frog Litoria genimaculata consist of a northern and southern genetic lineage that meet in a mosaic contact zone comprising two independent areas of contact: one where the main ranges of the lineages overlap, and the second where a population of the southern lineage is isolated within the range of the northern lineage. A recent study failed to find significant reproductive isolation between the main ranges of the two lineages, despite deep genetic divergence, partial postzygotic isolation, and call differences. The study did, however, demonstrate rapid phenotypic divergence and speciation of the isolated population of the southern lineage from both the parapatric northern lineage and from the allopatric, but genetically similar, main range of the southern lineage. Herein, the isolated population of the southern lineage is described as a distinct species, Litoria myola sp. nov., whereas the remainder of the southern lineage and the northern lineage are retained as a single, paraphyletic species, Litoria genimaculata. Resolving this unusual systematic situation demonstrates the value of using multiple lines of evidence in delimiting species. Litoria myola sp. nov. has a very small distribution and population size and warrants a Critically Endangered listing (B1, 2) under IUCN criteria. Threats and management recommendations are outlined, and the conservation of hybrid zones as areas of evolutionary novelty is discussed.

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Postby Chris Key » Thu Sep 15, 2011 8:17 pm

A new species of Crinia (Anura: Myobatrachidae) from the high rainfall zone of the northwest Kimberley, Western Australia

http://wamuseum.com.au/collections/nats ... al2009.pdf

Crinia fimbriata sp. nov

Records of the Western Australian Museum
25: 127–144 (2009).

ABSTRACT
Crinia is a large genus of small-bodied myobatrachid frogs that occur throughout most of Australia. They are less diverse in arid regions and northern Australia, and in the Kimberley are currently only represented by C. bilingua. Recent exploration of the northwest Kimberley has revealed another species of Crinia, here named Crinia fimbriata sp. nov. Molecular genetic analyses of mitochondrial nucleotide sequence data indicate the new species is a highly divergent lineage within Crinia. Compared to C. bilingua, the new species is smaller but with longer legs, has a dorsal ground colour of bluish greybrown, yellow-brown or red, with distinctive dark brown variegations and the entire dorsal surface is stippled with fine, pale bluish-white tubercles. Males of the new species have wide flanges on the fingers which are not typical of other Crinia species. The tadpole is also unlike any other known species of Crinia in that it has large jaw sheaths, which may be an adaptation for scraping algae from the rock pools in which it has been found. The male advertisement call has not been recorded. Within the Kimberley region, many species of frogs, reptiles and mammals only occur in the northwest along a narrow high rainfall zone from the Mitchell Plateau to the Prince Regent River Nature Reserve, making this region of especially high conservation value.
Last edited by Chris Key on Thu Sep 15, 2011 8:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby Chris Key » Thu Sep 15, 2011 8:34 pm

Taxonomic re-assessment of the Australian and New Guinean green-eyed treefrogs Litoria eucnemis, L. genimaculata and L. serrata (Anura: Hylidae)

http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2010/f/z02391p046f.pdf (abstract only)

Zootaxa, 2010;(2391):33-46

L. serrata name resurrected for "two lineages from the Wet Tropics of north-eastern Australia that are currently assigned to L. genimaculata." due to molecular genetic analysis.

and

we remove Nyctimystes loveridgei from the synonymy of L. genimaculata and place it in the synonymy of L. eucnemis.

ABSTRACT
The green-eyed treefrogs (Litoria eucnemis species-group) are found throughout New Guinea and some of its offshore islands, and in two geographically separated regions in north-eastern Queensland, Australia. We examine the genetic relationships among populations of the complex from across its range and find that populations fall into two major lineages: 1) specimens referable to L. genimaculata from New Guinea and its offshore islands, and L. exophthalmia, and 2) samples referable to L. eucnemis from New Guinea and northern Cape York, Australia, and two lineages from the Wet Tropics of north-eastern Australia that are currently assigned to L. genimaculata. Based on our molecular genetic analyses, morphological assessment of new collections and re-examination of type material, we retain L. eucnemis as currently recognised for northern Cape York populations but resurrect the name L. serrata for the Wet Tropics populations. The degree of reproductive isolation between the two Wet Tropics lineages is being studied currently and so at this point we refer both to L. serrata. The degree of genetic variation observed in L. genimaculata across New Guinea locations and possible paraphyly with L. exophthalmia suggest the presence of additional undescribed species. Reexamination of type material and collection of new specimens, allow us to reassess the status of several other names currently synonymised with L. eucnemis and L. genimaculata. Our observations support the present synonymy of Hyla rhacophorus with L. eucnemis and we remove Nyctimystes loveridgei from the synonymy of L. genimaculata and place it in the synonymy of L. eucnemis.

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Postby Gerry Marantelli » Thu Sep 15, 2011 9:02 pm

thats five - and 2 on the way for chris!

the rest of you will need to get your skates on!

my guess is we are looking for about 25+ - so you can still catch him!!

and it would be good to see more contributors and don't worry if Chis gets too far in front maybe i will offer a second prize!

so the quicker you start the more chance you have - every species found is one less you can claim as your own!!

thanks heaps
Gerry

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Postby Aaron » Thu Sep 15, 2011 10:16 pm

Species boundaries among barred river frogs, Mixophyes (Anura: Myobatrachidae) in north-eastern Australia, with descriptions of two new species

http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2006f/z01228p060f.pdf (abstract only)

Zootaxa
Issue 1228, 9 June 2006, Pages 35-60

- This paper describes Mixophyes coggeri and Mixophyes carbinensis from splitting Mixophyes schevilli.

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Allozyme, chromosomal and morphological variability in the Litoria lesueuri species group (Anura : Hylidae), including a description of a new species


S. C. Donnellan and M. J. Mahony 2004
Australian Journal of Zoology 52 (1) 1 - 28

- Litoria jungguy and Litoria wilcoxi

Systematics of the Litoria citropa (Anura: Hylidae) complex in northern New South Wales and southern Queensland, Australia, with the description of a new species


Mahony et al., 2001, Rec. Aust. Mus. 53(1): 37–48

- Litoria daviesae

Systematics of sphagnum frogs of the genus Philoria (Anura: Myobatrachidae) in eastern Australia, with the description of two new species

Knowles et al., 2004, Rec. Aust. Mus. 56(1): 57–74

- Philoria richmondensis and Philoria pughi
Last edited by Aaron on Thu Sep 15, 2011 10:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby Aaron » Thu Sep 15, 2011 10:23 pm

A new species of rock-dwelling hylid frog (Anura: Hylidae) from the eastern Kimberley region of western Australia.

Doughty, P., and M. Anstis . 2007. Records of the Western Australian Museum 23: 241-257.

- Litoria staccato

An emerging frog diversity hotspot in the northwest Kimberley of Western Australia: another new frog species from the high rainfall zone

Doughty, P. 2011. Records of the Western Australian Museum 26: 209-216.

- Litoria axillaris

Multi-locus phylogeny and taxonomic revision of Uperoleia toadlets (Anura: Myobatrachidae) from the western arid zone of Australia, with a description of a new species

Catullo, R., Doughty, P., Roberts, J. D. & Keogh, J. S. 2011. Zootaxa, 2902, 1-43.

- Uperoleia saxatilis

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Postby Gerry Marantelli » Fri Sep 16, 2011 12:37 am

OK - now we have another runner!

thats 5 for Chris and 8 for Aaron - i will need to adjudicate on the poaching of the 2 Mixophyes if the race is tight - so will leave that aside for the moment.

well done both of you - and anyone else will need to be quick as the species are running out!

many thanks guys - i will have to set more work and competitions here in future!

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Postby Aaron » Fri Sep 16, 2011 7:39 am

Gerry Marantelli wrote:OK - now we have another runner!

thats 5 for Chris and 8 for Aaron - i will need to adjudicate on the poaching of the 2 Mixophyes if the race is tight - so will leave that aside for the moment.

well done both of you - and anyone else will need to be quick as the species are running out!

many thanks guys - i will have to set more work and competitions here in future!


Haha poaching was not my intention, I was clarifying what species were described for Chris because I have the full paper in my files.

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Australian microhylid frogs (Cophixalus and Austrochaperina): phylogeny, taxonomy, calls, distributions and breeding biology.

Hoskin, C. J. 2004. Australian Journal of Zoology 52: 237-269.

- Cophixalus aenigma

A new species of Arenophryne (Anura: Myobatrachidae) from the central coast of Western Australia.

Doughty, P., and D. L. Edwards . 2008. Records of the Western Australian Museum 24: 121-131.

- Arenophryne xiphoryncha

Diminutive new species of Uperoleia Grey (Anura: Myobatrachidae) from the vicinity of Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.

Young, J. E., M. J. Tyler, and S. A. Kent . 2005. Journal of Herpetology 39: 603-609.

- Uperoleia daviesae

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Postby Chris Key » Fri Sep 16, 2011 9:10 am

heh it's not a competition at all, if Aaron has easy access to these then go for it!

I'll see if I can get some more done today.

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Postby Gerry Marantelli » Sat Sep 17, 2011 1:07 am

well its kind of a competition as i have offered a prize!

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Postby Eipper » Mon Sep 19, 2011 10:08 pm

Gerry,

I sent a list of species and papers to Frank re this. I can forward you a copy if you like for memory there was about 15 new species and a couple of reserections eg serrata and wilcoxi etc

cheers
Scott

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Postby Aaron » Mon Oct 03, 2011 6:07 pm

Two new frog species (Microhylidae: Cophixalus) from boulder habitats on Cape York Peninsula, north-east Australia

Hoskin, C. & Aland, K. (2011). Zootaxa, 3027, pp. 39-51.

- Cophixalus kulakula, Cophixalus pakayakulangun

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Postby Gerry Marantelli » Wed Mar 14, 2012 12:02 pm

sorry guys have not been back for a bit.
ok looks like we finished with Aaron in front.
Aaron let me know which prize you want from the ones offered and PM me with where to send it (if its not the crickets etc)
If you want the insects you can just order them online through the ARCade and remind me of who you are with the order (use the comments section). so i send them free. you can order as often as you like until the $100 is gone.

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Postby Eipper » Sun Oct 27, 2013 5:03 pm

New Frog

Cophixalus petrophilus

Cheers,
Scott

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Postby Aaron » Mon Oct 28, 2013 10:46 am

Another new one that wasn't posted on here I don't think.

A new species of Crinia (Anura: Myobatrachidae) from the Flinders Ranges, South Australia.

Donnellan, S., Anstis, M., Price, L., and Wheaton, L. (2012). Zootaxa, 3499, 1-26.

- Crinia flindersensis

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Postby Eipper » Sun Jun 08, 2014 8:10 pm

new Frog

Uperoleia stridera


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