Starting a breeding program in my school

For all those who care for our magnificent native frog fauna at home. Share information on enclosures, feeding, which frogs to select, and general care advice.

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concerned
spawn
spawn
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 2:23 pm
Location: South West, Western Australia

Starting a breeding program in my school

Postby concerned » Thu Feb 23, 2012 12:34 pm

Hi all,
I am a gardener at a primary school in the South West of Western Australia. Some people might call me too ambitious or rather silly as I do not know very much about frogs. Last year I worked with a young autistic boy (once a week) he came and fed the worms in my worm farm but he also had a mad facination with frogs. He and a few other special needs kids seemed to come out of their shells and where willing to listen and learn when it comes to frogs. After doing some research I thought it would be a great idea to try and set up a breeding program for certain species that are dwindling in our area. It would be great for the conservation side of things as well as a great learning tool for the kids at my school. Not just the special needs kids. The fact is I do not know where to start to get this off the ground. I know Perth Zoo has a breeding program and as far as I know they are the only ones in the state who do this. I have spoken to our Deputy Principal and she is willing to back me on this venture. Any comments, tips or information on this would be greatly appreciated. I can be contacted on melissa.davis@det.wa.edu.au

anastasia courtney
frog
frog
Posts: 154
Joined: Thu Jan 15, 2009 10:25 am
Location: Victoria

Postby anastasia courtney » Thu Feb 23, 2012 10:39 pm

I'm not sure what the specific laws in western australia are but in Victoria it is illegal to release any frogs into the wild, so that does include putting tadpoles into a pond and raising them up. This is for disease control issues. You'll need to look into that side of things first.
My Uncle who lives in Perth made the mistake (according to my aunt) of attracting motorbike frogs to his pond and now they come back every year to bread (they really do sound like very loud motorbikes!) Try and find out what are the common frogs around your area and find out what conditions they like (some might like very still water some might need moving water, as well as different vegetation). You could probably try and contact Perth Zoo they may even have 'school kits' for exactly what you are looking to do.

Good luck I would have loved to have had something like that at my high school :D

shona
tadpole
tadpole
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2006 3:14 pm
Location: Perth, WA

Postby shona » Tue Feb 28, 2012 9:38 pm

Sounds like a great plan, I would have loved it if we had something like that at school :)

In WA you need a herp Keepers licence to keep frogs in captivity - see here: http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/content/category/43/378/1988/

You also need a Takers licence to take a reptile/amphibian from the wild. I have no idea if that also applies to taking tadpoles from the wild to keep in captivity but would assume so.

A better option might be to build frog friendly ponds as if the frogs are free to come and go then you arent keeping them in captivity and dont need a licence.

There is a tadpole sharing program run by the WA museum - I'm not sure if there are any donors near you but could be worth a look (or contact them to see if they know anyone down your way, the published donor list might only cover Perth). The donor list is at the bottom of this page:

http://frogwatch.museum.wa.gov.au/Backy ... fault.aspx

The frog watch site also has info on frogs in your area and on frog friendly gardens.

If there isnt any donors in your area, a frog friendly garden should still attract your local frogs on its own, just might take a bit longer :)

concerned
spawn
spawn
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 2:23 pm
Location: South West, Western Australia

Postby concerned » Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:25 pm

Thank you for your information, it is greatly appreciated. I would dearly love to set up a few frog ponds on our school site but unfortunately that is out of the question. We would need the proper fencing and safety equipment and I don't think the government would spend money on this. Our grounds, even though are very large are not properly fenced and the public has access to it on the weekends and after hours. As I would like to think that most people would do the right thing, there is still quite a lot of vandalism and destruction and would hate to think that I would put poor froggies in harms way for that to happen. Keeping frogs in the wild would be the best outcome but it is not an option where I am. Once again thank you for your information it is greatly received. I will kept plodding along and will keep you updated as to my progress. Cheers


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