Photography guide for frog identification?

Need some help to identify a frog (or tadpole or egg mass)? Sounds like a job for the collective minds of the Community. Photographs and/or recordings are greatly appreciated. Results guaranteed (All money cheerfully refunded).

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RubyMu
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Joined: Fri Sep 16, 2005 3:42 pm
Location: Tewinga, Mid North Coast, NSW

Photography guide for frog identification?

Postby RubyMu » Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:33 am

Apologies if this has been asked before, I had a look around, but couldn't find any info about what to photograph to identify frogs. I guess it's pretty obvious once you are used to identifying frogs but, being new to this, I would love some assistance.

After reading some frog profiles, and your suggestions on my previous posts, I woudl say the 'groin' area and the eyes. I guess that the feet are important too. Aside from the call, is there any other frog parts I should pay particular attention to when photographing for identification purposes?

Also, how to get the frog to show me his groin? I saw one photo where the leg was extended a bit - my concern is hurting them if I 'pull' the leg out. Any tips?

Sorry in advance if my questions are obvious.

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Donna
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Postby Donna » Mon Sep 19, 2005 2:25 pm

I just spent half an hour writing a reply to this post and it disapeared! :shock:

Try downloading Lucid player and the frogs of NSW from here: http://www.faunanet.gov.au/faunakeys/frogs_intro.htm
It is free, but you will have more luck downloading it if you are on broadband.

Using the key to the frogs will soon get you used to looking for their features. It works on a process of elimination.

Some things to photograph are: Eyes, Tympanum (ear), belly, toes, webbing between toes, fingers, note their length from snout to bottom, colouring in groin and behind knees, look for raised glands on face, behind neck, on leg and down the flank. Listen to calls. If your camera is digital and has a memo facility, use it to record the call if possible.

You can extend the legs by carefully placing your pointer and centre finger along their back towards the head and use the thumb and ring fingers to push the legs back. This immobilises them so they cannot hurt themselves by struggling to get free. I sometime put a small strip of clean wet rag arount the chest of little frogs like a harness and hold on to the rag, not the frog. Once they cannot put their feet on anything they will stop struggling. I use a clean piece for each frog. Make sure your hands are totaly clean and free from any chemicals. wash them again afterwards.

I have made folders on my computer for different families eg. Hylidae, and then subfolders with the genus eg. Litoria This way you can sort them easy as you learn more about them. Have fun and try not to distress them unnecesarily if you can help it.

Donna

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RubyMu
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Joined: Fri Sep 16, 2005 3:42 pm
Location: Tewinga, Mid North Coast, NSW

Postby RubyMu » Mon Sep 19, 2005 2:54 pm

Thank you Donna and Dave!!

What excellent replies you both posted - I really appreciate it, especially the frog handling techniques. My terror is that I will hurt them inadvertently or if they struggle. I guess gentleness and practice as you both say is the key.

And thanks for those 'things to look for' - I didn't realise the underside was so important! I can see I have started in on a very complex topic and look forward to my further frog education.

Thanks again for your time in responding to my post. Your comments have been most helpful.


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