he is big, beautiful, looks half starved...but what is he?

Need some help to identify a frog (or tadpole or egg mass)? Sounds like a job for the collective minds of the Community. Photographs and/or recordings are greatly appreciated. Results guaranteed (All money cheerfully refunded).

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phonetic fish
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he is big, beautiful, looks half starved...but what is he?

Postby phonetic fish » Mon Feb 19, 2007 1:59 pm

Last night we had buckets and buckets of rain... a good thing I assure you, the humidity here in Tassie is a killer! this afternoon around ten to two, I was opening yet another window in order to encourage a cross draught.I looked down to pick up some stuff the dog had hidden behind the couch when I saw it.

My first instinct was "grab it quick!" because the dog was right beside me, however as a part of understanding ecology and the environment better, I have been giving the kids lessons in what they should and shouldnt do when they find injured or lost wildlife.

I told Jerry to find me a clean cup, pulled the couch forward and sprang (literaly) into motion.

"lesson one: never touch what you cant identify for sure."
jerrans response : it can hurt you as much as you can hurt it!

"lesson two: always keep a new animal seperate from any other animals... why?"
both girls :they might be sick, or eat the littler ones.

I am so proud of my girls... so now in a smallish container I have what I am Assuming is not a Littoria ewingii.

I am sure of this because he is nothing like miss croaky!

First of all he is definately a he. he squeeked a bit of a disstress cry when I scooped him into the safe enclosure of the cup, and again when I put him in the container.

He is about 2 inches long and an inch wide at the shoulders, his belly is a mottley of light grey, mid grey and white, looks smooth and on the underside of his legs he is a definate red/pink with white spots... if he were a baby Id say they were like milk pimples. :lol:

from the looks of his rather large feet he has to be a burrower or tree frog of some sort as there is absolutely NO webbing at all and the middle toe on the hind legs is substantialy longer than the rest. I cant see any indication of suckers or pads on any of the toes and the tips of the fore feet are ever so slightly curved... there is a wierd looking fleshy lump on the rear legpart way between the innermost toe and what I would describe as the ankle.

working my way up the body, he is a pretty boy with a bumpy

just a sec... he was just "burrowing", using his hind legs to push directly out at 90 degrees to his body using the flesh pads and the front legs to reverse

back to his colouring slightly bumpy skin, mid olive/green to almost black splotches, with a pretty coppery brown under his eyes and center of his top lip. almost perfectly circular pupils.

the closest thing I could find in the image database was Limnodynastes dumerili sub species insularis. while the first picture looks nothing like this one I have, further down the page there are several photos and the last one in the first columnbefore the "breeding behaviour" is very close!

I wont stress him out any more so I wont have a photo for a while... as I said, he looked half starved so I put a cricket in "Just in case"

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Gulper
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Postby Gulper » Mon Feb 19, 2007 2:15 pm

You can't post a pic, can you? If he is shuffling backwards, it does sound like a pobblebonk, and they are more likely to be active after a good dump of rain.

We need a bit more rain up here at Cradle, I am preparing to evacuate as the fires draw closer..

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GrantW
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Postby GrantW » Mon Feb 19, 2007 3:08 pm

Yes, most likely Limnodynastes dumerilii insularis, I found they were quite common in northern Tas when I was there.

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Donna
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Postby Donna » Mon Feb 19, 2007 4:43 pm

Female frogs can make distress calls too.

Donna

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phonetic fish
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he's looking a bit better... and wetter!

Postby phonetic fish » Mon Feb 19, 2007 6:34 pm

I guess that I should know by later tonight... Last night there was a chorus of at least two different species.

For the time being I will call it a he.

Despite living here in Tasmania most of my life I have never seen a frog quite like this one. He has the most amazing looking legs. They are realy quite chunky and muscular, im thinking body builder as opposed to miss croakey's gymnast musculature.

Now that he has had a decent bit of rest in a moist (but not sloppy wet) place he is looking a little better. I am concerned about two rather large bumps on his back... its almost as if he hasnt eaten for so long that you can see the bones sticking through the muscles. The cricket is still alive so I dont think he can be THAT hungry.

could it be dehydration? he was after all, trying to hide under a pink hula skirt behind the couch. lol... frog in a hula skirt! hehehe

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GrantW
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Postby GrantW » Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:01 pm

I'm sure the frog is fine, you will find that wild frogs are much more slim than frogs kept in captivity. Does the frog look like this: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/e ... ularis.jpg


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