Licence idea from Queensland

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Evan
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Licence idea from Queensland

Postby Evan » Sun Jan 07, 2007 9:23 pm

Reading the licencing page on this website, I came across what Queensland allows for keeping frogs.

ARC wrote:A person may take and keep up to eight adult frogs of up to four species but no more than two frogs of any one species "for personal enjoyment". The "taking" (catching) must be done on the person’s own property and the frogs be kept on that property. The frogs can’t be displayed and should there be progeny, the metamorphs must be released at the point of capture within 7 days of metamorphosis.


I really like this idea, as it allows the old practice of kids collecting tadpoles and frogs from their farm/garden, and raising them into frogs. It would create further interest in frogs, and hopefully lower the amount of commercialisation, and mistreatment of frogs, in the pet industry. It should be limited to those species which are not considered endangered, and you are required a licence to keep them still.

The main downside I can see is if the owner has a diseased frog which is not from the property, which spreads to the property frog and is then passed on to wild frogs once it, or its offspring, are released. For this reason, it might be good to have some kind of disclosure on the licence (or even a different licence), which states that you cannot acquire a frog from off the property unless you have none from your property in care.

What do other's think of this?

Thanks,

Evan

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Ann
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Postby Ann » Mon Jan 08, 2007 8:09 am

I think a possible problem as well is any damage /injury done to the frogs in the attempted catching.
Ann

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Evan
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Postby Evan » Mon Jan 08, 2007 9:52 am

I can see that, but I don't know if it is a huge problem. It isn't easy to hurt a frog if you are not trying to harm it. Young children could be a problem, as they can be rough, but you would hope that their parents would help in catching as it would mostly be done at night.

Possibly add a note on how/when to catch frogs, with a strong reccomendation that children be supervised, be attached to the info sheet which is given with the licence?


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