Be careful what you wish for

The Frog Watch project focuses on frog-friendly gardening - the approach to conservation is based on learning, appreciation and involvement. This forum deals with all topics relating to providing habitat for local frogs including ponds, plants, and fish.

Moderators: Chris Key, Gerry Marantelli, Mod Squad

annette
metamorphling
metamorphling
Posts: 92
Joined: Sat Apr 05, 2008 9:20 am
Location: South West Victoria

Be careful what you wish for

Postby annette » Fri Mar 04, 2016 7:22 pm

After years of tending ponds in my garden and delighting annually in watching the arrival of Southern Brown (Littoria ewingii) tadpoles I longed to see Pobblebonks. Well, last year just before Xmas, they arrived.....and the spawn masses yielded numerous Pobblebonk tadpoles. I was delighted....however, these tadpoles grow rapidly, and they are huge compared to the Southern Browns (which are green and its many variations in this belt of Victoria).

My conundrum now is that the Pobblebonk tadpoles resemble bull sharks (minus a dorsal fin) as they cut through the water surface. The Southern Browns are tiny in comparison, and would easily fit into the mouth of a Pobblebonk tadpole....much to my dismay.

Fortunately lots of Southern Browns have reached maturity and moved into the garden. However, the small morphlings left are no doubt in danger of being Pobblebonk food.

My question is, do Pobblebonks return to spawn in the same places annually? If so, I may consider moving the spawn masses in future, despite my belief in Nature taking its course, I love photographing Southern Browns as they are such a beautiful, delicate little frogs and co-existence in the same pond may be pointless if they just get eaten....

User avatar
Aaron
frog
frog
Posts: 967
Joined: Mon Nov 13, 2006 7:09 am
Location: Sydney, New South Wales

Postby Aaron » Sun Mar 06, 2016 12:39 pm

Hi Annette,

It can be tricky trying to find a balance. In my experience the two species should co-exist reasonably well as both the tadpoles and the frogs generally occupy different habitats. The easiest way to separate the breeding areas would be to have another pond that is elevated (like a bird bath) that the banjo frogs can't climb into. Removing the egg masses of the Banjo Frogs would be another option and they are quite hardy so you could transfer them to a large container where they can develop separately to the pond.

annette
metamorphling
metamorphling
Posts: 92
Joined: Sat Apr 05, 2008 9:20 am
Location: South West Victoria

Postby annette » Wed Mar 09, 2016 3:47 pm

Thanks Aaron, that makes sense, as yes they do occupy different habitats. We are on a farm, and the Pobblebonks don't usually come into the garden much, but obviously two did! Funny thing is that my other pond is clean and has no tadpoles currently....they could have gone there, but didn't. I will go with the status quo for now, and consider the options you mentioned down the track. Many thanks for replying! Food for thought.


Return to “Frog-friendly gardening”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest