Plants for garden pond and surround (bog garden)

The Frog Watch project focuses on frog-friendly gardening - the approach to conservation is based on learning, appreciation and involvement. This forum deals with all topics relating to providing habitat for local frogs including ponds, plants, and fish.

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sande
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Location: knoxfield vic

bog ggy planting

Postby sande » Sun May 25, 2008 8:13 am

excellent information another great gardening day ahead as i now know what to do next!

I know this is a'how long is a piece of string question'

Given that i am on a busy road and my frog habitat i have hopefully created is surrounded by house, garage and carport with a bit of access to the rest of the garden

how long before i can hope to see frogs?


Thanks again for the prompt and helpful reply
cheers Sande

David De Angelis
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Postby David De Angelis » Mon May 26, 2008 5:46 pm

When frogs arrive will depend on where the closest source population is, connectivity between your place and neighboring habitat, whether next-door have cats that are likely to snap them up, etc. But... they should get there eventually! The busy road doesn't help but if there are frogs on the other side, a few would be likely to get across at some stage.

Have fun planting and let us know how it all goes.

David.

David De Angelis
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Postby David De Angelis » Fri Jun 27, 2008 12:30 pm

For those in NSW wanting to create a frog/bog garden or revegetate using local plants, here's a link to a fairly comprehensive list of nurseries stocking indigenous and/or native tubestock:

http://www.ilda.com.au/page/nurseries.html

Cheers,
David.

sande
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thanks for help re plants

Postby sande » Sat Jun 28, 2008 8:28 am

We have had a bit of rain in knoxfield so there is a bit of water about down at the lake which is 1k away the frogs are singing happily i hope one day a family adopt us

The planting went extreamly well and the little plants are happy and growing.

THANKS FOR YOUR ADVICE THAT WAS A TREMENDOUS HELP

there are lots of little bugs I will wait till late spring to get fish to give the frogs a chance to find us

I am not keen on mossies!

I need to find out when the frogs mate in our area apparently to get an idea if they are about.

The weather has been ideal for planting so i have been going for it and have planted about 50 local plants
One area with butterfly & bird plants and a prickly thicket for little birds

I have reclaimed an area of lawn with mulch and plan a wildflower garden next

thanks again for help
Sande

David De Angelis
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Location: Victoria: Melbourne

Postby David De Angelis » Sun Jun 29, 2008 8:58 pm

Good to hear the pond and plants are doing well. Hopefully it won't be too long before you start hearing visitors!

David.

David De Angelis
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Location: Victoria: Melbourne

Postby David De Angelis » Sun Jun 29, 2008 9:14 pm

For creators of frog/bog gardens in Vic using indigenous plants, a revised list of indigenous plant nurseries is available via the following link:

http://www.greeningaustralia.org.au/ind ... nodeId=160

("Native Nurseries greater Melbourne" download)

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Growler18
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Postby Growler18 » Mon Oct 27, 2008 3:42 pm

wish i had some frogs in my garden :( :x

annette
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Postby annette » Fri Apr 10, 2009 9:47 am

I would recommend bromeliads for frog environments.

I always find frogs (ewingii) on bromeliads in my garden, and deliberately plant them now.

The one I have is amazingly tough - it is (Googled it!) Tillandsia rectifolia - it has long, upright, thin leaves, and as a bonus it looks like a clumping grass. It has yellow dangling flowers at times. I had some in pots and have split them up and planted them around pond edges.

Regards

LitZer
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Postby LitZer » Thu Jan 14, 2010 6:37 pm

I am a lucky gardener to have a moist soil for my bog garden. Bee balms are my favorite perennial plants which grows in it. I also added a small pond and to make it more interesting, I added some artificial Silk Plants hanging on the little bridge.

heskey627
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Postby heskey627 » Wed Aug 18, 2010 1:22 pm

I want to change the looks of my garden so i am looking for plants and i came through this website http://www.nationaltropicals.com.au/ ,This site provide wide range of plants and every breed of plants

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Leah
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Postby Leah » Tue Oct 12, 2010 5:48 pm

Mmm, savouring lots of great ideas from this thread. Bucopa sounds like a must-have.

We seem to be a bit short of aquatic plant breeders here in Townsville. I've made a note to call The Complete Garden and Townsville Aquarium and Pet Centre but I really want some tall rush-type plants that grow in water to soften the hard edges of my (very oblong) pond.

Failing legitimate supply, and instead of loitering around the lake in the botanical gardens with plastic bags and evil intent, maybe I could call the local council and see if I can buy some rushes. They might even take pity on my pensioner status...

Christopher Muscat
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Frog Friendly Gardens

Postby Christopher Muscat » Wed Mar 02, 2011 3:45 pm

Bromeliads- Are also a great way of providing Homes for frogs. They are very adaptable to many countries & various climate's.
Bromeliads originated from Virginia - USA, through to the tip of Sth America. From Deserts to Rain forests. Sea level to very high altitudes.
These species are now found across the world.

I live in the inner City of Sydney & have adapted my yard to accommodate, Ponds & Australian natives - Ferns to many species of Bromeliads of which provide excellent shelter & coverage from birds & other wildlife.
I have many Striped Marsh Frogs with many more to come (Tadpoles)
also seem to keep the mosquito's larvae down, as these plants hold & store water.

Bromeliads generally have a cupped center. Each Leaf-branch (Bract) can accommodate many frogs (example -Pineapple top, is a Bromeliad) They vary in Size from miniature to Giant plants, exceeding several meters in diameter. (Aechmea Braziliana)
They are very colourful & do produce flowers, which also encourages insects & other creatures, which is & becomes a natural food source for your frogs as well.

Give Your Frog A Home, or many!!!

neetz
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Location: victoria

easy answer

Postby neetz » Wed Jun 12, 2013 4:01 pm

www.ozwatergardens.com.au

they have great knowledge and I have spoken to them a few times I highly recommend them to talk to as they are a water plant supplier and can provide expert advise and where your local water garden nursery would be


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