Plants for garden pond and surround (bog garden)

The Frog Watch project focuses on frog-friendly gardening - the approach to conservation is based on learning, appreciation and involvement. This forum deals with all topics relating to providing habitat for local frogs including ponds, plants, and fish.

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obsidian
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Plants for garden pond and surround (bog garden)

Postby obsidian » Tue Mar 28, 2006 4:47 pm

Hi, I know that this topic hs been brought up before, but its never really been answered in depth.

I've seen mention that some normal garden plants will grow in water, but I can't find out anywhere which ones those actually are. (Except irises [which aren't native] but only some types)

As far as what plants frogs prefer, apart from just "natives" does anyone have any specific plants that frogs particularly like?

And are there any particular plants to avoid? I mean obviously a cactus isn't going to be a good choice, and I'm assuming things like herbs that have a sort of lingering smell if you bruise the leaves would be no good (not that I'd plant herbs, but as an example)

Is the way they are planted more important that what is planted? in that they won't care what the plants are, but like hiding under and jumping on type plants are the way to go.

At the moment I'm still planning my plants and I've been thinking about going mainly purply/blue type theme with flowering plants (and including some non-natives to achieve that), but a lot of grasses and bushes to make a densely planted garden for protection and moisture.

I've read that fucias can go in a bog garden, which is handy because I have some in pots waiting for a suitable spot in the garden, and I love irises which can grow there too, I love boronia so I was thinking about planting some of those. I think dad has some "spare" canna lillies I can have. As for in the pond, I want water lillies, but other than that I have no idea. I've been warned about duckweed, but I've seen the suggestion to use it when the pond is new to help get the coverage to avoid too much algea , and I'm prepared to do constant removal since I do quite like it. I'm contemplating using something like a piece of rope on the top of the water to keep it contained to certain areas (somewhat).

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Nick Thorne
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Postby Nick Thorne » Tue Mar 28, 2006 9:32 pm

Karanga Native plant nursery at Mount Evlyn have a good range of native and indigenous to Melbourne pond plants. They also have information sheets about what is available. Karanga are open 7 days 9 to 5. They also have a great gist shop with all sorts of
australian produce and other iitems as well as an excellent cafe. Try the Yarra Valley Ice cream in raspberry, it is to die for...

Another alternative is the indigenous plant nusery at the Wild Life Reserve at La Trobe University. They have an extensive range of pond and bog plants available in tubes, plus they can tell you anything you want to know about plants native to the Melbourne area. They are open on the weekends, but contact them first to find out hours.

Nick

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Postby Gerry Marantelli » Tue Mar 28, 2006 9:51 pm

You can also try Victorian indigenous nurseries co-op (VINC) at Yarra Bend Park - I think open 7 days. They also have many pond plants and good advice.

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pond plant

Postby roybe » Tue Apr 04, 2006 10:14 pm

hello, I have a plant in my pond the botanical name I think is called hydrocorus commonly called frogwort, I suppose the name says it all. I'll try and photograph it and put it on my blog. regards roy

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Postby JimOwens » Sat May 06, 2006 7:49 am

One of the plants that the baby frogs in my pond seem very fond of is Bucopa.
It grows on boggy land or in water, and it spreads over the surface of the water nicely (but not too quickly) and it has nice mauve/blue (insect-attracting) flowers from time to time. The frogs live inside it and climb up on top to sunbathe. I've seen as many as six on it at one time.

Regadrs, Jim
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Bucopa.jpg

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Propagating "Frogsmouth"

Postby Donna » Tue Jan 16, 2007 8:41 am

Has anyone grown "Frogsmouth" Philydrum lanuginosum from seed? Do you have any tips for getting them going? I really don't want to divide the clump just yet, and it has set some seed.

For anyone who doesnt know this plant, it is an australian native marginal aquatic plant. I have mine in a pot sitting about 4" from the surface of the water, and it seems quite happy. At the moment there are about 4 or 5 dwarf tree frog metamorphs sitting amongst it. It is a strappy sort of plant, with the new leaves coming out folded up, and it gets lovely little yellow flowers.

Donna
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Frogsmouth new foliage.jpg
Woolly frogsmouth flowers.jpg
Woolly frogsmouth flowers

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Postby CarolynS » Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:09 pm

This is my first time actually replying to anything. So here goes...
I got my plants from La Trobe Uni's Indig. Nursery. The service and advice was fantastic. I haven't got babies yet but I've had a Banjo hanging around for a couple of weeks!! The plant that was recomended to me, amoung others, was a native, no probably indigenous, milfoil(spelling?). Apparently it helps aerate the water??? Anyway, I think your choice of plants will be affected by your location and the size and type of pond/bog you are building. That's probably why you haven't had too many lists of plants for your pond. One of the nurseries mentioned by Nick will be able to guide you in the right direction.

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Frog friendly plants for Melbourne area

Postby David De Angelis » Thu Feb 08, 2007 3:20 pm

For those living around Melbourne and surrounds, there’s an extensive rage of locally native (indigenous) plants available for your frog ponds. These plants are ideal as they're adapted to local conditions, won't become environmental weeds and will also provide habitat for other native animals. As much as possible, try to obtain plants grown from locally collected seed or cuttings as this helps maintain local genetic diversity.

A few common aquatic/bog/moist soil plants indigenous to much of Greater Melbourne that will help to provide ideal frog habitat:

Acaena novae-zelandiae (Bidgee Widgee)
Alisma plantago-aquatica (Water Plantain)
Azolla filiculoides (Red Azolla)
Carex spp. (Sedges)
Crassula helmsii (Swamp Stonecrop)
Eleocharis spp. (Spike-rushes)
Epilobium spp. (Willow Herb)
Hydrocotyle laxiflora (Stinking Pennywort)
Isolepis spp. (Club-rushes)
Juncus spp. (Rushes)
Lobelia spp. (Lobelia)
Lythrum hyssopifolia (Lesser Loosestrife)
Myriophyllum spp. (Water Milfoil)
Persicaria decipiens (Slender Knotweed)
Potamogeton spp. (Pondweed)
Phragmites australis (Common Reed) - can become overgrown if left unchecked
Ranunculus lappaceus (Australian Buttercup)
Rumex brownii (Slender Dock)
Schoenus apogon (Common Bog-rush)
Triglochin spp. (Water-ribbons/Arrowgrass)
Typha domingenis or T. orientalis (Cumbungi) -. can become overgrown if left unchecked

Species available from your local indigenous nursery will vary depending on what plants are local to your specific area. A map of Melbourne’s Indigenous nurseries is available from http://www.greeningaustralia.org.au/GA/ ... ylists.htm

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Postby mwalmsle » Sat Feb 10, 2007 6:16 pm

I live in Melbourne's west and have just had my third batch of taddies hatch out in my Frog Pond! (1 batch last year and now 2 batches this year).

In melbourne's West there is a great Indiginous Nursey in Newport:

NEWPORT LAKES NATIVE NURSERY 2 MARGARET ST NEWPORT (enter via Newport Lakes Reserve) PH (03) 93910044 Fax (03) 53695293

They have a great range of aquatic plants available and tube stock is all you'll need to have a flourishing pond in no time at all.

I have Potamagetan growing in full swing which is a great plant for deep water sections. The frogs love the Swamp Crassula (not sure of botanic name) which I have growing around the edges of my pond and also growing into it. it is a great refuge for Taddies - the last batch of taddies in my pond - I never saw the egss they were so well hidden!!

Runing Marsh flower is another good one (not sure of botanic name) - sorry a bit of a layman when it comes to that. This I also grew from tube stock and is very fast growing! This one has yellow flowers which look great!

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Postby David De Angelis » Sun Feb 11, 2007 4:07 pm

The swamp crassula would be C. helmsii (listed above as Swamp Stonecrop) and Running Marsh Flower Vilarsia reniformis. There's another marsh flower indigenous to south-east Melbourne around the Frankston/Langwarrin area with the name (V. exaltata). V. reniformis is a great semi-aquatic that ground-dwelling frogs such as marsh frogs and Crinia seem to absolutely love!

David.

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Postby Lauren » Sat Mar 03, 2007 2:49 pm

My husband and I are rebuilding an old dam that was previously just a hole in the ground filled with muddy water. We have fenced it off from the stock, made it much bigger and even created a small island. Now I am in the process of trying to plant it all up and want to include as many frog attracting plants as possible. I have printed out the list posted here and plan to visit Kuranga nursery at Mount Evelyn. I will keep visiting this site in the hope of getting more ideas but any advice would be greatly appreciated. Lauren

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Postby Donna » Sat Mar 03, 2007 6:25 pm

Sounds like a great project, dont forget to plant grasses, shrubs etc around it to give different varieties of frogs hidy places, and a protected area to move out from the pond when they metamorph.

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Postby Lauren » Sat Mar 03, 2007 6:57 pm

Thank you Donna, Yes I have already planted up a lot of different grasses and low shrubs on the "island" and intend planting them all around the edges of the dam plus more trees and shrubs around the outside if we ever get any RAIN!!! All together it covers about 1/2 an acre including a shallow area for the water birds to wade in. What do you suggest as shelter for when the frogs metamorp? I am planting various reeds around the edge and will hopefully have some water lilies. We have also added some old stumps and branches that will be partly underwater. Can't wait until I hear my first "croak" but you sure have to use your imagination at the moment.

Lauren

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Postby Donna » Sun Mar 04, 2007 2:05 pm

Try things like Lomandras, (if you have a local species) overlapping rocks, logs with hollow spots under them, things with cracks or loose old bark etc. Lots of mulch, you would be surprised where they will hide. We find in our seasonal pond that some of them get down in the cracks of the clay as the pond dries out.

Donna

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Postby David De Angelis » Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:55 pm

Hi Lauren,

There may be an Indigenous Nursery closer to your locality in West Gippsland. Better to source indigenous plants locally to maintain local genetic diversity. They should also be a bit cheaper and save some travelling time.

As Donna suggested, plants such as Lomandras are ideal to plant in the surroundings. There should be one or two species indigenous to your area (try L. longifolia). Also local moisture-loving grass tussocks such as Poa labillardieri are good for providing cover for frogs.

A map of VIC regional nurseries can be found at: http://www.greeningaustralia.org.au/GA/ ... ylists.htm

Cheers,
David.

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Postby Lauren » Tue Mar 06, 2007 7:04 pm

Thank you David, Yes I have already been planting the plants you recommended but think I can probably plant both a lot closer to the waterline than I have been doing although not sure exactly where that is going to be at this stage or how long it will stay there. That is one of the problems I face at the moment. I printed out the list of nurseries from the website you sent and there are quite a few close by so will be checking them out. Must try and work out how to send some photos.

Lauren

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Postby Lauren » Fri Jun 15, 2007 9:50 pm

Back in March I wrote requesting information about planting up a new dam. Thank you Donna and David for your advice. The dam is now slowly filling and I have a variety of some type of aquatic plant growing naturally around the edges. I don't know what it is but already I have frogs. Have yet to actually sight one but there is plenty of noise until they hear me approach. I took your advice David and found an indigenous nursery only just up the road and have bought and planted out probably at least 100 plants so far. I will be on the lookout later for somewhere that sells aquatic plants but it is a bit early to plant these as the water will rise another 4 to 5 feet yet. I will keep you posted and send a photo if I can work out just how to do it. Lauren

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Postby David De Angelis » Sat Jun 16, 2007 10:52 am

Brilliant! It's great to hear about projects like this one yielding positive results so soon. Looking forward to seeing a photo. Also, if you're able to post a photo of the floating aquatic we'll see if one of us can identify it.

Keep up the good work.

David.

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Postby stakaz » Wed Jan 16, 2008 12:50 pm

I have found Edendale farm in eltham good for indigenous plants as well. they are cheaper than latrobe and VINC as they are council owned.

Also swamp goodenias are great around the pond with the casula helmsii. along with the lomandras (filiformis and longifolia are the most wide spread) dianellas another tussock like spieces with bright purple flowers is also useful.

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Plants & trees?

Postby novice » Tue Feb 05, 2008 3:05 pm

Does anybody know the type of aquatic, bog & reg. plants [all native] of the Penrith region, that attract the frogs?
Also what are the 'traditional' tree frog trees [Green, Grey & Bleating species] ? :idea:
Julie

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specific plantre quirements

Postby sande » Fri May 23, 2008 9:32 am

this is my first contact with the forum

I am in the ferntree gully region of victoria

i have actually made a great start on my frog habitat

i had afish pond i have placed logs in and stones around

i had a wonderful visit and report from 'gardens for wildlife' which is a community group that are hopimg to connect habitat for local species. their report has put a fire in my belly they also sent me 'bonking in the garden' which was inspiring

i went to knox environment society (KES) nursery and bought local plants

I am searching for specific planting and height/ width

as i am unsure which ones i can put in the pond itself and how much room i need to allow as i am planting between stones
the last lot of plants i got from KES i planted 2 years ago this month and i planted them too close together they heve grown vigorously and i am hoping to do this 'properly'
here is the list i hope you can help me

Lomandra filiformas -wattle matt rush
carex brownii
lomanda longifollia var exilla- spring headed matt rush
gahnia sieberiana-red fruited saw sedge
centella cordifolia- swamp pennywort
eloeocharis acuta-common spikerush

thanks Sande

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Postby David De Angelis » Fri May 23, 2008 4:05 pm

Welcome Sande,

Good to hear you are using local plants. The Centella, Eleocharis and Carex are mainly bog plants and grow well in shallow water or mud around the edges. They can be spaced at approx 40cm intervals although the Eleocharis and Centella will spread so you could plant these further apart. Lomandra longifolia and Gahnia can be planted a short distance away from the edge and form larger tussocks so are better spaced even further apart (1-1.5m). Lomandra filiformis is a smaller tussock and generally a drier area plant so it can be planted some distance away from the pond. The people at KES should also be able to assist you with planting advice.

Crasula helmsii, Persicaria decipiens, Juncus spp. and Carex apressa are examples of other very common aquatic and bog plants for your region that can provide ideal frog habitat in and around smaller ponds. See the list below for other suggestions.

Cheers,
David.

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Postby David De Angelis » Fri May 23, 2008 4:08 pm

i.e: the indigenous bog and aquatic plant list on the previous page.

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how do i plant into the pond?

Postby sande » Sat May 24, 2008 9:37 am

thankyou david that is very helpful advice

I am still confused about how to actually plant into the pond

It is a fiberglass fish pond and i have reversed the bi-level moulded stepped dishes to give shallow levels Do i put soil into these?
do i semi or fully immerse pots?
i am unsure

I have put water into this pond? Is it meant to be a very low level of water?

Also whilst i am waiting for frogs is there any way i can keep the moissies down?

thanks again
sande

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Postby David De Angelis » Sat May 24, 2008 4:45 pm

Bog plants can be immersed from about 3/4 of the way to the rim of the pot without a problem. Most of the semi-aquatics such as crassula can be either fully submerged or treated as bog plants. If you use the multi-stepped dishes to create shallow levels in the main pond, these can be submerged so that they fill with water. Soil or potting mix can be placed inside them first to simulate a bog-type situation for plating straight into. If you choose this option, it's often useful to use river pebbles as a "mulch" on top to prevent too much of the planting medium from drifting away.

The water level you start with is up to you - just remember it's likely to fill right up during winter (if we get some more rain!) and loose water in shallower sections during summer through evaporation. This is likely to influence where and how you plant. For example, true aquatics are probably better positioned at or towards the deepest levels to that they survive the summer, whereas semi-aquatic and bog plants in shallower sections can often better tolerate fluctuations is soil saturation - from partial submersion to partial drying out.

To keep mossies down, the best option would be to source indigenous fish from an aquarium that sells them. I often recommend Australian Smelt Retropinna semoni as they are local as well as frog and tadpole friendly. However, they are more expensive than the more traditional pond fish and often aren't available. Another is the Murray rainbowfish Melanotaenia fluviatilis as recommended by Nick Thorne in previous threads. It isn't indigenous to the Melbourne area but might be a cheaper and more readily available alternative. Some of the threads below also have more information re introducing frog-friendly fish.

Cheers,
David.


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