Novice - no DIY skills - want to make a pond 4 mailbox frogs

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coubay
spawn
spawn
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2012 3:08 pm
Location: Maryborough Qld

Novice - no DIY skills - want to make a pond 4 mailbox frogs

Postby coubay » Sun Nov 25, 2012 3:42 pm

Hi everyone.
We moved her 5years ago and well time has merged so not sure how long on and off we have had frogs in our mailbox, it started as one and by Summer last year we had 7 and no its not a big mailbox, it is a small old metal one that gets very hot.
They left after 1 died and I thought that was the end of it but last week one came back. I had intended for sometime to create a pond for them but before we could even start planning we flooded for the first time (Feb 2008) and then in September 2010 we flooded again and over the next 4 months we flooded another 9 times.
The water is street water so full of chemicals and pathogens plus some paddock water from a ag-block so more chemicals, so I was racking my brain on how I could have a pond without it getting flooded. The council is finally fixing the faulty drain that was causing the problems but I want to play it safe.
My solution and I am here for input so please comment is -
A child's plastic sandpit put directly on top of the grass out the front (the front only gets 2 inches deep where as our backyard can get knee deep). I am going to pile up rocks and logs around it and some native grasses amongst them so the frogs can get in and out.
I want to plant it with native lilies and any other native plants that will benefit the frogs. And I want to put in some rainbow fish to keep the mossies down as my daughter is allergic to them.
As it is in the front yard I believe I will have to put some wire mesh over it to prevent kids falling in, any idea what size is suitable so the frogs can still use it?
In addition to this I am going to plant some bromiliads near my bird of paradise to create another water source.
Any ideas on how to avoid the local toads taking up residence?
I am sure there are answers on here but I am finding it all a little overwhelming, just sooo much wonderful info.
What should I put in the bottom?
Is hose water ok?
It will be under a coral tree and the drop heaps of leaves and sticks, will this be a problem? This is near the mailbox so the are more likely to notice it.
I think what I need is a fact sheet on the basics of a frog friendly, toddler friendly toad avoiding pond lol.

coubay
spawn
spawn
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2012 3:08 pm
Location: Maryborough Qld

Postby coubay » Sun Nov 25, 2012 4:06 pm

I can't do much manual labour as I have been in a few car accidents (not at fault) and have back and pelvic injuries, so that is my other problem finding the least labour intensive way to help the frogs :)

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Nick Thorne
frog
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Location: Lilydale, Victoria
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Postby Nick Thorne » Tue Nov 27, 2012 2:46 pm

Hi there and welcome to the site. Frogs don't actually live in the water for the most part, they use water to breed and obviously their tadpoles live in the water. The main consideration to to ensure that any frogs that get into your pond can get out again, not all frogs have "suckers" on their feet and ground frogs may drown if they can't get out. A branch leaning against the side will do the trick. Otherwise what you are proposing should be OK. Leaves and so on won't cause too many problems. Tap water will be OK, as any residual chlorine will dissipate in a day or two. The mesh for child safety could be 100 mm welded wire mesh which will keep kids say and frogs can come and go. These plastic sand pits make perfectly good small ponds, You can put some gravel in the bottom if you want for cosmetic reasons, or just allow the fallen leaves to accumulate. As for plants, I would ask a local native plant nursery about what's native to your area. You may have problems trying to grow lilies as the water will be quite shallow, but talk about it with your nurseryman. Any reed or grass like emergent plants that you plant in or around the pod will be good for frogs. Also, you don't want to have it in full all-day sun or you will have problems with algae. Good luck with it! Nick

Sean
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Postby Sean » Fri Nov 30, 2012 10:25 pm

Your idea sounds good. Only problem would be the frogs drowning in it, but if you get a small log that sticks out of the water edge they should be fine.

I remember one of the gurus on here (forget which one) saying that leaf litter is fine but soil is not. The soil can harbor harmful worms and parasites.

With water you might have fluoride in your tap water. I have heard this is bad for frogs and can not be easily removed. We have tank water here so I really don't have much experience with fluoride and frogs. Rain water is best if you can collect it.

Wire mesh will help keep cats out as well. Just try and get something strong in case a child decides to walk on it.

Not to sure about plants either. Something like Dianella is great in Victoria but I am sure QLD has its own plants.

With toads you really would just have to keep an eye out for them I think. Become familiar with their eggs so you can remove them, I think they are in strings. And be carfull because some native frogs look alot like toads to the untrained eye.

Also your frogs might like a FROG POLE. Would stay cooler than a mailbox, try and find somewhere in the shade for it.

All the best,
Sean

lolita1
tadpole
tadpole
Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Dec 28, 2009 1:21 pm
Location: Brisbane

Postby lolita1 » Sat Jan 12, 2013 1:16 pm

Hi

Also a Queenslander who does not want to breed toads lol. I ended up using horse troughs that are plastic bought from the local horse feed produce at approx $30 to $40 each. Plus where the toads could hop in I put up some mesh to keep them out. I have read approx 50cm high will keep toads out.

Cheers

lolita1
tadpole
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Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Dec 28, 2009 1:21 pm
Location: Brisbane

Postby lolita1 » Sat Jan 12, 2013 1:18 pm

BTW I would also not keep under a tree that would drop alot of leaves, add pacific blue eye fish as they will keep mozzies down and also in summer think of the amount of sun and possibly add a shade cover over the pond. The one thing you need to think about is that actually your frog pond is really a fish pond as it is the fish that will live in it 24/7/365

Cheers


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