Native Fish For A Frog Pond

The Frog Watch project focuses on frog-friendly gardening - the approach to conservation is based on learning, appreciation and involvement. This forum deals with all topics relating to providing habitat for local frogs including ponds, plants, and fish.

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edsworry
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Native Fish For A Frog Pond

Postby edsworry » Mon Dec 29, 2003 8:51 am

Would anyone please let me know what native fish i can introduce to my frog pond that will not eat the tadpoles? Also which fish would be most suited to help with the mosquito problem?


Thanks. Eddy

edsworry
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Postby edsworry » Mon Jan 05, 2004 1:00 pm

Thanks Dave
Eddy

JimOwens
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Postby JimOwens » Sun Jan 11, 2004 12:41 am

Hi Eddy,

I have Pygmy Perch (Edelia vittata) in my pond, they are native to WA, and obviously breed very well.

Regards, Jim

edsworry
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Postby edsworry » Sun Jan 11, 2004 6:45 pm

Thanks for the reply Jim.You have had no trouble with the Pigmy Perch and the tadpoles and the frog spawn? I am hearing alot of differing opinions about the Pigmy Perch over here in Vic. So i wish to be very sure as to what i put in my pond. Also how prolific do they breed?
Eddy.

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Postby JimOwens » Sun Jan 11, 2004 7:07 pm

I bought 4 Pygmy Perch and 2 White Cloud Mountain Minnows about 6 months ago, and no problems so far - except that I have about thirty or forty young fish now (the young White Clouds get eaten though because they are only a quarter the size of the Perch when hatched.
I do provide supplimental feeding for the fish though (baby earth worms, chopped earth worms and tropical flakes) - the logic being that if they are hungry they are more likely to eat tadpoles.

Also I have been encouraging friends at the university where I work to start ponds (which they are doing) so I will be giving them fish soon.

Regards, Jim

edsworry
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Postby edsworry » Thu Jan 15, 2004 10:21 pm

Thankyou again for the information Jim.I think i will hold off adding fish to my pond for a while.Do some more homework.I am keen on the pygmy perch, although i am still reluctant to add them as yet. I have been told that Golden Madakis(dont know correct spelling) are good to put in ponds as they are very small and also keep the mossie problem down.Again i need more info on this type of fish. Well i guess time will give me the answers i need. Thanks again.......Eddy

Lars Fields
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native fish

Postby Lars Fields » Thu May 20, 2004 6:45 pm

Please do not use White Cloud Minnows nor any other exotic species in your frog pond. White Cloud Minnows have already escaped in NSW and are becoming established in the wild. The last thing this country needs is another feral animal. Most important, never use Gambusia, a serious aquatic pest fish introduced in the 1930's. If you go out to catch your own fish, make sure you don't bring Gambusia home by accident. Never release any pet or pond fish into any natural waterbody.

And just as we like to encourage indigenous frogs to our ponds rather than introducing them, it's important to use indigenous fish in our ponds. Even if a fish is "native" to Australia, it doesn't mean it belongs everywhere in the country. Try to find fish that are indigenous to your specific region and preferably source them from within your specific catchment.

For example, in Melbourne, it would not be appropriate to use fish like Western Carp Gudgeons or Murray River Rainbows, as they are from the Murray River system north of the dividing range. Western Carp Gudgeons have been accidentally released on the south side of the dividing range and even though they are a native, they could become a pest species in this region.

Southern Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca australis) are an appropriate fish to stock in a Melbourne frog pond. They apparently won't eat all of your spawn if you have enough shallow refugia designed into your ponds. The _most_ appropriate fish is the Eastern Little Galaxia (Galaxiella pusilla), due to it's small mouth size and preference for the same habitat the many frogs use for spawning - ephemeral wetlands. Unfortunately, it is a vulnerable species and therefore it is currently illegal to collect, keep or breed it without permit.

In WA, there are a couple of similar species to G. pusilla - the Mud Minnow (Galaxiella Munda) and the Black Stripe Minnow (Galaxiella nigrostriata) , but I don't know if they are listed as a threatened or vulnerable species.

Lars Fields

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Postby Greg, Adelaide » Thu Jun 02, 2005 9:12 pm

Well said Lars.

It is a real pity that pusillas cant be encouraged as a pond fish in the right areas. Their tolerance to cold and the fact that they are supposed to aestivate in low water level means they can outlast gambusia a lot of the time and would be an ideal pond fish.

But Im sure they will be fully protected from captive breeding right up until the day they are extinct :?

stakaz
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Postby stakaz » Fri Apr 09, 2010 2:00 pm

It is a shame that the eastern little galazis is not available freely in melbourne for pond use. if it was, it may curb the typically common use goldfish!

It would also complete gardens completely for those that have indigenous ones

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Postby emma432 » Mon Jan 14, 2013 7:16 pm

Many pond fishes feed on tadpoles and that is just another tasty snack for them, I would say. But, there are options to grow fishes like gold fish, Gambeshi and Koi that are not harmful to frogs and tadpoles. I think it is better to go for a complete mosquito extermination process before growing fishes or ponds and also, perform timely checks on this.
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Postby Sean » Wed Jan 16, 2013 1:17 pm

emma432 wrote:Many pond fishes feed on tadpoles and that is just another tasty snack for them, I would say. But, there are options to grow fishes like gold fish, Gambeshi and Koi that are not harmful to frogs and tadpoles. I think it is better to go for a complete mosquito extermination process before growing fishes or ponds and also, perform timely checks on this.
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Pretty sure Emma might turn out to be a spammer (sorry if I am wrong). Gold Fish, Gambusia and Koi Carp are probably the worst fish to have with frogs and tadpoles.

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Postby Sean » Wed Jan 16, 2013 8:49 pm

Nathan Litjens' new web page is what I rely on. Take a look if you haven't already:

http://www.runwildtv.com/how-we-do-it/i ... ly-fishes/

:D

neetz
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native fish

Postby neetz » Wed Jun 12, 2013 3:43 pm

the best ones I have found and they are also native to parts of Victoria is the fire tailed gudgeon and the other is native to VIC, part of SA,NSW,and QLD is Australian Smelt.

Australian smelt fish are very fragile though!!!!!!!!

Victorians - if catching them from the Yarra river do not net them or touch them as they can die of stress quickly or you might break their fins, so catching them involves going at dusk, a bright torch and a little bucket, im told they start breeding in july!!

these are both reasonably small fish and generally eat algae and mosquito larvae :D

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Postby caitsith01 » Thu Oct 30, 2014 2:07 pm

People here constantly talk up native fish, but my experience with them is that they are completely woeful.

Many of them seem to be hyper sensitive to slight changes in water quality (which happens a lot in small backyard ponds).

Many species people constantly mention are basically not available anywhere in southern Australia (blue eyes, etc) or are very expensive.

Murray rainbows, often touted here as the best option, seem to hide at the bottom of my pond and basically never eat any mosquito larvae.

It's a great goal to try to have a totally natural set up. But in a back yard, it isn't practical to have millions of mozzies. In my case I'm pretty close to giving up on the rainbows and just unleashing some white clouds - at least by all reports they actually eat wrigglers.


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